Part III: The Edit - Mr. Gold

I've covered the concept and the process of shooting Mr. Gold in two previous posts. This time I'll tackle the post production side. About three quarters of the way through filming I had an idea of how I wanted this to look. I knew I wanted to introduce Jose in a very mysterious way at the beginning. Showing close ups of his outfit would work really well. Plus this adds some mystery which causes people to keep watching (very important because of our short attention spans). I also knew that I wanted to keep it under 5 minutes. I would have loved to make it a little longer, maybe 10-15 minutes, but I knew this would work well as a web video. From what I've learned anything over 5 minutes on the web gets drastically lower view counts (there are exceptions, like niche markets and if you get featured on a very popular site). Making it shorter would cater to more people.

The first thing I had to do was buy some editing software. After some research I settled on Final Cut X. I know some of you are probably gasping for air but hear me out. I've never edited anything before this so I didn't have the need for an editing program. I wanted something I could learn quickly so I could get this sucker out to the masses. From what I read X was very user friendly. Yes, everyone using 7 hated it because they couldn't import their old projects (I would be pissed at this too!). But I didn't have any old projects. I was starting from scratch so X would work fine for me.

Ok, now for the editing. I'm not going to lie...it was hard. Really hard. Telling the story wasn't the hard part. Understanding the program and all it's intricacies was hard. It's one thing to know how you want something to look. It's another thing to know how to get it that way.  After purchasing a Ripple Training series it became a lot easier.

There were a few things I set out to accomplish while editing. After sifting through the interview I knew it would be a good idea to highlight his background. I really thought the prison photos were great. They were a harsh reminder of his background and I thought the one of him in front of the painted backdrop was funny (I have a weird sense of humor). At one point I looked into filming in a prison but there were too many hurdles to jump through.

It was a windy day when Matt and I were filming high-speed. I had Matt grab a shot of Jose's coat waving in the wind. During editing this became a crucial shot. I used it at 2:36 and it's where the story climaxes. The shot reminds me of a superhero's cape flapping in the wind. I placed it where I did, when the music becomes more engaging and amidst him telling his most memorable story, because I knew it would further drive his story home.

You'll notice that I tried to put more of the personality type shots (him dancing, waving, etc.) near the end. If these were placed at the beginning I feel they wouldn't have meshed well with the story of his background. I think that would be my biggest piece of advice to someone editing, and it's pretty simple. Probably one that doesn't need to be told. But I'll tell it anyway, make sure your dialogue, music, and visuals match. Peppy music and a sad story just don't go well together. That being said all rules are meant to be broken.

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The footage after the credits was too good to pass up. I tried to put it in the body of the film but couldn't find a place where it flowed smoothly. The irony of it is subtle but great. His gold teeth represented his past life (something he talked about in our interviews but didn't get included in the film) and getting them removed represented a new chapter for him. The irony is how well they work with his job. I mean, come on! You're named Mr. Gold and you have gold teeth but you get them removed to shed the old you! It's movie making gold (get it?)!

Seriously though, it was a very moving thing to witness. The smile on Jose's face was a mile wide and he couldn't stop saying, "Woah!" for 30 minutes. The owners of Diamond Exchange found a dentistry practice to donate their services, which made it even more touching.

A good buddy of mine named Kyle Cox scored the piece. At first I wanted some subtle ambient music (think Explosions in the Sky). Kyle did some research and was really inspired by the urban nature of the film and by the score for the move Drive. He had this once piece of music laying around and thought it would be the perfect fit. I'll have to admit it took me a few days to warm up to. The music wasn't bad it just wasn't what I had in my head. But after sitting on it for a bit I was convinced. I think the score really helps set Mr. Gold apart from other shorts because it doesn't sound like them. It's different and catches your attention. Also, Jose's voice doesn't fluctuate much when he talks. The music brings some energy that another score might have lacked.

Have any questions? Leave them in the comments and I'll make sure to answer them.

Up Next - Part IV: The Promotion