Behind the Photograph

Daytona Beach, FL

There are a lot of hidden stories in the still image. Rarely do they house one narrative. This is a chance for me to tell you about those stories. 

Curiosity is something I treasure and a quality I love to encourage in others.

I love shooting film, particularly when it's medium format. There is something special about the medium. For me it's not the color or the nostalgia. It's the pace I find comforting, a pace that is more in line with the way in which I want to live, particularly in our Facechat Snapbook times. Film forces me to slow down, to think about each and every swing of the shutter. I arrange the frame with intentionality. I think through my actions. And this is not the only thing that is attracts me to it. I have noticed time and time again people appreciate being photographed with medium format film. I can not count the number of people who have been curious to know how this boxy, mechanical contraption works. Often times I will let them look through the viewfinder and teach them a little about it. Usually more questions follow, which I am excited to answer. Curiosity is something I treasure and a quality I love to encourage in others. This curiosity usually leads to an eagerness to have ones photo taken. I do not think of it as a manipulative practice, though one could take it to that extreme. I feel it is more of a collaborative practice. 

Every year I try and make it out to Bike Week in Daytona Beach, FL, which is where this photo was taken. Having lived in Florida all my life I was always aware of Bike Week but it was my attendance at a photo program in college in Daytona that really got me interested in it. Bike Week is an odd gathering. It is slightly off the radar of the general population but it draws a wide variety of people. Lawyers and construction workers, northerners and southerners, soccer moms and vagabonds. The potential for great pictures is endless. 

Film forces me to slow down, to think about each and every swing of the shutter.

Out of the corner of my eye I spotted this woman sitting on a curb down a side street. In this packed environment it was surprising to see she was the only one there. As I approached her I remember thinking she looked tired but content. I loved the monochromatic colors of her surrounds and how well they contrasted with her outfit and the curb. Your eye immediately lands on her and slowly drifts to the right, along the curb, to the sandbag. The sandbag mimics her posture (or maybe she mimics the sandbag?). Her posture is so flippant. It says, "I'm tired, I'm sweaty and I don't really care," as a smirk creeps up from her mouth. There is something so oddly comical and touching about it.

I approached this woman and asked if I could take her photograph. She said a simple "yes," I stepped back, took two or three frames, said my thanks and walked away. There are times when photography is a wrestling match. Where you fight with your self and the constraints of time and the medium to make something which speaks to you and the viewer. This was not one of those times. Although it only took a matter of minutes to make this picture it is one I am very proud of.